Posts Tagged ‘of’

Cindy Cohn & Katitza Rodriguez
EFF

Does using cloud computing services based in the United States create a risk of US law enforcement access to people’s data? The US Department of Justice (DOJ) seems to be trying to placate international concern by saying one thing in international fora; but it says something quite different quite in the US courts.

On January 18, a senior Justice Department official tried to reassure companies and people around the world that hosting their data in the United States creates no increased privacy risk for them from the US government. Deputy Assistant Attorney General Bruce Swartz noted: “Cloud computing has important advantages to consumers (but) doesn’t present any issues that have not always been present. Certainly not regarding Internet service issues, but even before that.”

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– People remember where to look up information – not the info itself
– People actively forget information if they think they can look it up later
– Tests on how people remembered items they would normally Google

Rob Waugh
Mail Online
January 24, 2012

The Internet is becoming our main source of memory instead of our own brains, a study has concluded.

In the age of Google, our minds are adapting so that we are experts at knowing where to find information even though we don’t recall what it is.

The researchers found that when we want to know something we use the Internet as an ‘external memory’ just as computers use an external hard drive.

Nowadays we are so reliant on our smart phones and laptops that we go into ‘withdrawal when we can’t find out something immediately’.

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Via: Register:

“It wasn’t secret, we just didn’t need to tell anyone about it” said Sid Heaslip, Programme manager at Opentext discussing the TOP SECRET FACEBOOK OF POWER that his company made for the G20 summit in 2010, exclusively for the leaders of the world’s most powerful nations to network with.

Despite keeping the network codenamed “V20″ under wraps at the time, Opentext execs are now keen to discuss the world’s most elite social network, not least because the aura of power and secrecy around the summit gives their cloud-based document-sharing software a little more sex appeal than the average cloud-based document sharing software package enjoys.

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Tuesday, January 24, 2012 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) There is a growing body of scientific evidence which proves that genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) are inherently different from natural organisms, including the way the body processes them, as well as how the immune system responds to them. But Monsanto, the largest purveyor of GMOs in the world, believes that GMOs are no different than natural organisms, and that GMO testing is both needless and valueless.

In the Why aren’t you running human clinical trials on GM crops? section of Monsanto’s Food Safety page, the biotechnology giant explains its opinion that GMOs are “substantially equivalent” to natural organisms. According to Monsanto, since concentrations of proteins, carbohydrates, and other nutrient factors vary among natural crops, as well as among natural and GM crops, then these differences are automatically unimportant in light of GMO safety.

Furthermore, Monsanto claims that its injection of foreign DNA into its GM crops is also automatically safe because, get this, DNA is present in natural crops as well. Never mind that the injected DNA is foreign and unnatural, and is used to alter the entire genetic structure of GM crops — according to Monsanto, its unnatural DNA is automatically non-toxic because every other plant also has DNA. Case closed.

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THIS IS A BAD THING, WATCH AND PASS ON NOW. WE NEED TO SHUT THIS DOWN LIKE WE DID SOPA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8FzkVRh7Ck

Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com
January 23, 2012

Iran has reacted angrily to an agreement by European Union foreign ministers to impose an oil embargo on the country.

Following the agreement reached on Monday, Iranian lawmaker Mohammad Ismail Kowsari, deputy head of Iran’s influential committee on national security, said the strait “would definitely be closed if the sale of Iranian oil is violated in any way.”

A fifth of the world’s oil moves through the Strait of Hormuz.

Monday, January 23, 2012 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Food commodity prices have been on the rise over the past two years, which means food retailers, vendors, and restauranteurs have had to figure out creative ways to absorb these added costs while still offering quality products that their customers can afford. But it looks like 2012 will be a definitive year where these costs are directly passed on to consumers, as a new survey indicates that most restaurants will be raising their menu prices this year.

Nation’s Restaurant News (NRN) recently released its 2012 Restaurant Operators Survey, which includes data on pricing strategies from more than 150 restaurant respondents. The report explains that 67 percent of restauranteurs plan to raise their menu prices this year, while 64 percent say they will specifically raise their prices between one and three percent.

Of those who said they would raise their prices, 31 percent said they would raise them as high as six percent. And six percent of those who said they would raise their prices indicated that they would do so by more than six percent. Only two percent of respondents said they planned to lower their menu prices.

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Mike Barrett
Activist Post

With today’s manufacturing there are many chemicals and toxins that are both purposefully added to products, as well as those unintentionally added.

Mercury is one of those unintended additions to many of the products people consume and topically apply every day. In order to avoid exposure to this heavy metal, and in turn avoid the risk of any heavy metal toxicity, you need to know where the metal resides in order to avoid it.

Mercury Highly Present in Many Foods and Consumer Products

One of the most significant places you may find mercury is in processed foods

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Retail pork products in the United States. have a higher prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA) than previously identified, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Public Health and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.
MRSA can occur in the environment and in raw meat products, and is estimated to cause around 185,000 cases of food poisoning each year. The bacteria can also cause serious, life-threatening infections of the bloodstream, skin, lungs, and other organs. MRSA is resistant to a number of antibiotics.

The study, published Jan. 19 in the online science journal PLoS ONE, represents the largest sampling of raw meat products for MRSA contamination to date in the U.S. The researchers collected 395 raw pork samples from 36 stores in Iowa, Minnesota, and New Jersey. Of these samples, 26 — or about 7 percent — carried MRSA.
“This study shows that the meat we buy in our grocery stores has a higher prevalence of staph than we originally thought,” says lead study author Tara Smith, Ph.D., interim director of the UI Center for Emerging and Infectious Diseases and assistant professor of epidemiology. “With this knowledge, we can start to recommend safer ways to handle raw meat products to make it safer for the consumer.”

The study also found no significant difference in MRSA contamination between conventional pork products and those raised without antibiotics or antibiotic growth promotants.

“We were surprised to see no significant difference in antibiotic-free and conventionally produced pork,” Smith says. “Though it’s possible that this finding has more to do with the handling of the raw meat at the plant than the way the animals were raised, it’s certainly worth exploring further.”

To read the full findings from the study, visit: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030092 Additional information about the Center for Emerging Infectious Disease can be found atwww.public-health.uiowa.edu/CEID/index.html, and more on Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy at http://www.iatp.org.

You may remember the 2010 Guatemala sinkhole that made the news… Well there have been more since 2010, all seem odd, and some say a “odd hum” like the odd sound heard around the world coming from this hole.

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George F. Will
Washington Post
January 19, 2012

When the Los Angeles Police Department developed a Suspicious Activity Report program, the federal government encouraged local law enforcement agencies to adopt its guidelines for gathering information “that could indicate activity or intentions related to” terrorism. From the fact that terrorists might take pictures of potential infrastructure targets (“pre-operational surveillance”), it is a short slide down a slippery slope to the judgment that photography is a potential indicator of terrorism and hence photographers are suspect when taking pictures “with no apparent aesthetic value” (words from the suspicious-activity guidelines).

One reason law enforcement is such a demanding, and admirable, profession is that it requires constant exercises of good judgment in the application of general rules to ambiguous situations. Such judgment is not evenly distributed among America’s 800,000 law enforcement officials and was lacking among the sheriff’s deputies who saw Nee photographing controversial new subway turnstiles. (Subway officials, sadder but wiser about our fallen world, installed turnstiles after operating largely on an honor system regarding ticket purchases.) Deputies detained and searched Nee, asking if he was planning to sell the photos to al-Qaeda. Nee was wearing, in plain view, a device police sometimes use to make video and audio records of interactions with people, and when he told a deputy he was going to exercise his right to remain silent, the deputy said:

“You know, I’ll just submit your name to TLO (the Terrorism Liaison Officer program). Every time your driver’s license gets scanned, every time you take a plane, any time you go on any type of public transit system where they look at your identification, you’re going to be stopped. You will be detained. You’ll be searched. You will be on the FBI’s hit list.”

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Thursday, January 19, 2012 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Identifying threats to health freedom and freedom of health speech often requires connecting the dots between seemingly unrelated verbiage in one piece of legislation and a trade agreement, for instance, or reading between the lines to identify the full intent or scope of a provision or phrase added to an unrelated bill. And this is the case with the Stop Online Privacy Act (SOPA), which contains language that could one day target websites that sell, promote, or otherwise talk about the benefits of dietary supplements.

Section 105 of SOPA, entitled Immunity for Taking Voluntary Action Against Sites that Endanger Public Health, provisions that service providers, network providers, advertising services, search engines, domain name registry services, and other parties that handle internet content will be immune from prosecution should they decide to arbitrarily pull sites that “endanger the public health.”

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January 19th, 2012
Via: New York Daily News:

In an about-face, the feds have admitted wrongdoing in the cases of two elderly women who say they were strip-searched at Kennedy Airport by overzealous screeners.

Federal officials had initially insisted that all “screening procedures were followed” after Ruth Sherman, 89, and Lenore Zimmerman, 85, went public with separate accounts of humiliating strip searches.

But in a letter obtained by the Daily News, the Homeland Security Department acknowledges that screeners violated standard practice in their treatment of the ailing octogenarians last November.

Assistant Homeland Security Secretary Betsy Markey concedes to state Sen. Michael Gianaris (D-Queens) that Sherman was forced to show security agents her colostomy bag — a violation of policy.

“It is not standard operating procedure for colostomy devices to be visually inspected, and [the Transportation Security Administration\] apologizes for this employee’s action,” Markey wrote.

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Doctors have questioned the effectiveness and safety of the main drug used to treat pandemic flu

Thomas Moore
Sky News
January 18, 2012

The Department of Health maintains a Tamiflu stockpile to treat around 30 million people, at a cost of around £500m.

But doctors at the Cochrane Collaboration assessed 16,000 pages of clinical trial data and said there were “critical questions about how well the drug works and about its reported safety profile”.

Researcher Dr Carl Heneghan told Sky News: “What you are looking at in any drug is ‘what are the benefits and what are the harms?’. 

“Right now, without access to the evidence, we are not in a position to say the benefits clearly outweigh the harms.”

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Sayer Ji, Contributing Writer
Activist Post

The Polio Global Eradication Initiative (PGEI), founded in 1988 by the World Health Organization, Rotary International, UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, holds up India as a prime example of its success at eradicating polio, stating on its website (Jan. 11 2012) that “India has made unprecedented progress against polio in the last two years and on 13 January, 2012, India will reach a major milestone — a 12-month period without any case of polio being recorded.”

This report, however, is highly misleading, as an estimated 100-180 Indian children are diagnosed with vaccine-associated polio paralysis (VAPP) each year. In fact, the clinical presentation of the disease, including paralysis, caused by VAPP is indistinguishable from that caused by wild polioviruses, making the PGEI’s pronouncements all the more suspect.

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WIMBORNE, England – British mothers upset that their dead children’s brains were secretly removed and kept in jars said police are probing 40 cases in just one English county.

Horrified Lisa Burton, 40 — whose daughter Zoe was three when she died from epilepsy 15 years ago — said police visited her to break the news.

“They said there were 40 people affected — and that’s just locally. No one seems to be able to answer any questions, and I’m very angry,” according to Burton, from Wimborne in the county of Dorset, southwestern England.

Distraught Julie Middleton, 40, of Poole, Dorset, said cops gave her the same figure.

She learned that the brain of her six-week-old son Regan was still in a jar at Southampton General Hospital 12 years after his death.

The “missing parts” scandal was exposed by The Sun, which highlighted seven cases amid a nationwide probe.

Permission to keep the organs was not needed at the time they were stored by the hospitals, but the law changed in 2006. A report in March will uncover a figure for the UK.

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Anthony Gucciardi
Infowars.com
January 17, 2012

 

Groundbreaking new research has linked sodium fluoride to cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Researchers found that fluoride consumption directly stimulates the hardening of your arteries, a condition known as atherosclerosis that is highly correlatedwith the #1 killer. Sodium fluoride is currently added to the water supply of many cities worldwide, despite extreme opposition from health professionals and previous studieslinking it to decreased IQ and infertility.

In their research, scientists examined the relationship between fluoride intake and the hardening (calcification) of the arteries. Studying more than 60 patients, the researchers found a significant correlation between fluoride consumption and the calcification of your arteries. Published in the January edition of the journal Nuclear Medicine Communications, the research highlights the fact that mass fluoride exposure may be to blame for the cardiovascular disease epidemic that takes more lives each year than cancer. In 2008, cardiovascular killed 17 million people.

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We wish to assemble free and peaceful citizens outside the Manhattan District court in an effort to present the important message to family farmers that millions of Americans stand behind them as they seek their day in court. In the past two decades, Monsanto’s seed monopoly has grown so powerful that they control the genetics of nearly 90% of five major commodity crops including corn, soybeans, cotton, canola and sugar beets. This has resulted in onerous costs to farmers through high technology patent fees for seeds as well as burdensome litigation costs in defending themselves against lawsuits asserted by Monsanto.

In many cases organic and conventional farmers are forced to stop growing certain crops in order to avoid genetic contamination and potential lawsuits. Between 1997 and April 2010, Monsanto filed 144 lawsuits against American farmers in at least 27 different states, for alleged infringement of its transgenic seed patents and/or breach of its license to those patents, while settling another 700 out of court for undisclosed amounts. As a result of these aggressive lawsuits, Monsanto has created an atmosphere of fear in rural America and driven dozens of farmers into bankruptcy.

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Tuesday, January 17, 2012 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
(NaturalNews) Patients who had certain prescriptions filled at Walgreens between 1999 and 2006 may not have received the drugs they thought they did, or at the price they should have. A new class-action lawsuit accuses Walgreens of conspiring with generic drug-maker Par Pharmaceutical Co. to overcharge for certain generic drugs, and to substitute other more expensive drugs in place of what was actually prescribed.

Filed by the United Food and Commercial Workers Unions and Employers Midwest Health and Pension Fund, the lawsuit alleges that Walgreens violated federal racketeering laws by setting up special arrangements with Par to illegally substitute more expensive generic drugs in place of less expensive ones, which mutually boosted profits for both Walgreens and Par.

“Walgreens and Par engaged in at least two widespread schemes to overcharge insurance companies, self-insured employers and union health and welfare funds … for the generic versions of Zantac, Prozac, and other drugs,” says the suit.

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