Posts Tagged ‘Meat’

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Andre Evans
Activist Post

Meat is a staple food in the diet of many across the world. Whether or not you chooses to eat meat, its widespread consumption is undeniable.

Many meat-eaters opt to purchase organic meat in order to avoid the cocktail of hormones, additives, and other unwanted ingredients that go along with conventional meat products.

Despite this, the many forms of meat products are largely contaminated and have their own host of issues — including ‘antibiotic-free’ meats, according to a new report.

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by Gretchen Goetz
FOOD SAFETY NEWS

A controversial animal drug, fed to a majority of pigs raised in the United States, has become the focus of a long-running trade dispute centered on meat exports.

Ractopamine hydrochloride – used to keep swine lean and boost their growth in the last weeks before slaughter – is administered to an estimated 60 to 80 percent of pigs raised in the United States. But key trading partners,want assurance that it is safe, and have a zero-tolerance policy for meats with even traces of the substance. So export markets are limited, according to a report published Wednesday by msnbc.com.

The feed additive is also responsible for more deaths and illnesses among pigs than any other livestock drug on the market. It has killed or sickened more than 218,000 pigs since it was introduced, according to the analysis in Business on msnbc.com this week.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determined that ractopamine was safe for use in pigs 13 years ago – in 1999 – and has since approved it for use in cattle and turkeys as well.
The agency set a threshold for residues of the drug. Sale of any meat with levels below this amount are legal-
But testing for ractopamine in meat products has been limited. In 2010, for example, 712 samples were taken from 26 billion pounds of beef, and the results of this testing have not yet been released.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/01/a-controversial-animal-drug-banned/

If you’re planning on bartering emergency stockpiles and supplies in the event of a disaster then be sure to check applicable state and Federal laws or you may end up being the subject of a sting operation, as was the case with Chad Gerondale of Alaska.

Bartering may have been a necessary trade practiced by the earliest of our human ancestors, but in a society where central planning and control is the status quo, even the exchange of food or services becomes an illegal act:

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Retail pork products in the United States. have a higher prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA) than previously identified, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Public Health and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.
MRSA can occur in the environment and in raw meat products, and is estimated to cause around 185,000 cases of food poisoning each year. The bacteria can also cause serious, life-threatening infections of the bloodstream, skin, lungs, and other organs. MRSA is resistant to a number of antibiotics.

The study, published Jan. 19 in the online science journal PLoS ONE, represents the largest sampling of raw meat products for MRSA contamination to date in the U.S. The researchers collected 395 raw pork samples from 36 stores in Iowa, Minnesota, and New Jersey. Of these samples, 26 — or about 7 percent — carried MRSA.
“This study shows that the meat we buy in our grocery stores has a higher prevalence of staph than we originally thought,” says lead study author Tara Smith, Ph.D., interim director of the UI Center for Emerging and Infectious Diseases and assistant professor of epidemiology. “With this knowledge, we can start to recommend safer ways to handle raw meat products to make it safer for the consumer.”

The study also found no significant difference in MRSA contamination between conventional pork products and those raised without antibiotics or antibiotic growth promotants.

“We were surprised to see no significant difference in antibiotic-free and conventionally produced pork,” Smith says. “Though it’s possible that this finding has more to do with the handling of the raw meat at the plant than the way the animals were raised, it’s certainly worth exploring further.”

To read the full findings from the study, visit: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030092 Additional information about the Center for Emerging Infectious Disease can be found atwww.public-health.uiowa.edu/CEID/index.html, and more on Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy at http://www.iatp.org.

by Dan Flynn | Jan 16, 2012
FOOD SAFETY NEWS:

Four years ago when the organization long equated with the vegan lifestyle said it would give $1 million to any scientist who could make chicken in a laboratory, there were some willing to bet no one would meet the group’s challenge.
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Now with that deadline fast approaching, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) may indeed have to pay the reward. Somewhat suddenly, in vitro meat is attracting investment and research talent from around the world.

In vitro or cultured meat is not imitation meat — like all those vegetable-protein products that don’t taste anything like beef or chicken. In vitro or lab-grown meat is animal flesh, except it never was part of a living animal.

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