Posts Tagged ‘DoJ’

Kevin Johnson
January 29, 0212

The Justice Department is funding an unusual national training program to help police deal with an increasing number of volatile confrontations involving highly trained and often heavily armed combat veterans.

Developers of the pilot program, to be launched at 15 U.S. sites this year, said there is an “urgent need” to de-escalate crises in which even SWAT teams may be facing tactical disadvantages against mentally ill suspects who also happen to be trained in modern warfare.

“We just can’t use the blazing-guns approach anymore when dealing with disturbed individuals who are highly trained in all kinds of tactical operations, including guerrilla warfare,” said Dennis Cusick, executive director of the Upper Midwest Community Policing Institute. “That goes beyond the experience of SWAT teams.”

Cusick, who is developing the program along with institute training director William Micklus, said local authorities have a better chance of defusing violent confrontations by immediately engaging suspects in discussions about their military experience — not with force.



BY JENNIFER LYNCH, Electronic Frontier Foundation

In the latest turn in our Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit for records related to the government’s use of social networking websites, the Department of Justice finally agreed to release almost 100 pages of new records. These include draft search warrants and affidavits for Facebook and MySpace and several PowerPoint presentations and articles on how to use social networking sites for investigations. (For more on what we’ve learned from the documents so far, see our earlier blog posts here, here, here, here, here, and here.)

The draft search warrants are particularly interesting because they show the full extent of data the government regularly requests on a person it’s investigating. This includes not just your full profile information but also who you “poke” (and presumably who “pokes” you), who rejects your friend requests, which apps you use, what music you listen to, your privacy settings, all photos you upload as well as any photos you’re tagged in (whether or not you upload them), who’s in each of your Facebook groups, and IP logs that can show if and when you viewed a specific profile and from what IP address you did so.


Cindy Cohn & Katitza Rodriguez

Does using cloud computing services based in the United States create a risk of US law enforcement access to people’s data? The US Department of Justice (DOJ) seems to be trying to placate international concern by saying one thing in international fora; but it says something quite different quite in the US courts.

On January 18, a senior Justice Department official tried to reassure companies and people around the world that hosting their data in the United States creates no increased privacy risk for them from the US government. Deputy Assistant Attorney General Bruce Swartz noted: “Cloud computing has important advantages to consumers (but) doesn’t present any issues that have not always been present. Certainly not regarding Internet service issues, but even before that.”


Investor’s Business Daily reports

Bank of America (BAC) must turn over excess funds from a record $335 million discrimination fine to community organizing groups. Critics say it’s a “political backdoor” to subsidize Democrat-tied Acorn “clones.”

The unusual mandate is buried in a Justice Department filing last month detailing settlement terms with the nation’s largest bank. Prosecutors had alleged BofA’s Countrywide Financial mortgage unit discriminated against minority homebuyers in the years leading up to the financial crisis.

Funds not passed out to alleged victims after two years will be handed out to “qualified” groups unconnected to the case that provide credit and housing counseling and similar services to blacks and Hispanics in areas where the discrimination allegedly occurred.


Truth Support

Joseph Richards

Jan 10,2012

With tons of talk about using force in the Asia Pasific, Middle East, and North Africa. The “Sustaining US global leadership: Priorities for 21 century defense” gives us a pat on the back for killing, Sorry “delivering justice to” Osama bin Laden and al-Qa’ida.

When you read the “Primary missions of the US armed forces” You get to the homeland and read what should say “We plan on using NDAA as soon as we can with -insert list of reasons-”